Strategic Entrepreneuralism: We Are Our Own “Angels”

“Projects that trumpet and celebrate “The Triumph of Our Resistance” and the unknown s/heroes that carry our water every day, will not be funded by Hollywood Money Men, period.”

Human Statute of Africa

One of the reasons I cherish the experience I’ve had traveling to a number of different continents, and, as a regular dude, interacting with the regular people on the ground in places like Zimbabwe, South African, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Trinidad/Tobago, Grenada, Spain (where the Moors built the fantastical Alhambra), Paris, “iroc iran” (hello Stevie), and a number of Caribbean places. All of that to say, “rising up” is good sloganeering, but when you go to a Black country you realize much of what they are advocating for is a functional civic life for a majority of people. Job creation in Africa is basically non-existent; White (Lebanese, Chinese, Jewish, etc) folks, in one guise or another, run the most viable and profitable businesses in Africa. The point is, we here in America, have the luxury of thinking and acting on a Strategic level. That’s what CULTURALGRASSROOTS.COM is, a Strategic financial/social proposition that is really just the beginning. Just like Silicon Valley, and Hollywood, there are MONEY PEOPLE behind every transactions that goes on. CulturalGrassroots.com makes Us the “Angels”.

And those money people, “Angels”, talk about funding the best ideas by the best people, and for the most part, they are consistently looking for the “best”. However, there are a lot of projects in the “best and brightest category” that get discounted by White and White-like money people: Black entrepreneurs with Black projects. Good example: Movies and Television programs. Hollywood and their followers (including all Blacks in Hollywood, and Blacks making their money from major Advertisers), have three genres of movies they make and support: A) Ghetto Malaise (“your life sucks and your people aint shit”) ; B) Coon Comedies (Black man in drag, bugg eyes or involving prison; C) Up From Slavery Panegyrics (“boss we’sa so glad you don taken yo’ foot out of our ass, we could just kiss yours”).

But what about the films from the filmmakers that think more about Our Redemption, that want to show three dimensional images and stories from the Black Diaspora that reflect the real ins and outs of navigating through an oppressive superstructure and how that consciousness impacts our lives both lived and imagined (I know of a groundbreaking science fiction broadcast series that will enthrall and captivate Black imaginations for years to come).

Projects that trumpet and celebrate “The Triumph of Our Resistance” and the unknown s/heroes that carry our water every day, will not be funded by Hollywood Money Men, period. Films like these get made by people that dedicate their lives and careers to getting that one film done. Think about Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust”, Raoul Peck’s “Man By The Shore”, “Lumumba” and his latest, “Fatal Assistance” about the waist, mismanagement and theft of Haiti’s sovereignty  all under the guise of “helping”. And what about a documentary series that tells the real story of Our “Black Summer”, the events leading up to and the people involved in the period of time that Black folks were in the streets. We have yet to see a comprehensive take on the impact of the FBI’s counter intelligence program (COINTELPRO), using every dirty trick in the book, that eventually made “Black Power/Consciousness” a taboo phrase.

*CulturalGrassroots.com* is the only source of cash that is actually looking for these types of stories, and will have the infrastructure in place to market and distribute the finish product.

That is Black Power! not spoken, but felt and understood.

Ending Black Dependency: Images and Stories

The New You“At this stage of advanced technological development, part of the answer to ending Black Dependency is very simple: Images and Stories. The more we hear and see about the true nature of the way We live inside the belly of the Western beast, but particularly how we live in Africa, the closer we get to ending our dependency. We need to see the details of the social, economic and geo-political relationships that our countries in Africa have amongst themselves, but particularly how they relate to the world.” 

 

Dependency is the condition shared by all Black folks worldwide. We are up against forces that will not go lightly, and the impact they have on our psyche, which struggles with the desire for modernity as defined and bestowed by the West, and being “independent” and often poor and deprived of the technological and logistical convenience associated with the West. “You have to crawl before you walk” is the most appropriate aphorism for Black people worldwide trying to end their dependency, a dependency responsible for the retarded growth of Black human capital and civic development. But our Best and Brightest and Boldest won’t wait; their self esteem demands the best of what the West has to offer, which is why it is so easy for them to be co-opted by the West — Hollywood stardom playing or producing depressing stereotypes, illegal resource extraction, capital flight and tax evasion, willing western proxies in Resource Wars that destroy Black society and enrich the West — some do it out of impatience, some do it out of ignorance, some out of pure selfish greed.

At this stage of advanced technological development, part of the answer to ending Black Dependency is very simple: Images and Stories. The more we hear and see about the true nature of the way We live inside the belly of the Western beast, but particularly how we live in Africa, the closer we get to ending our dependency. We need to see the details of the social, economic and geo-political relationships that our countries in Africa have amongst themselves, but particularly how they relate to the world. Western media is so very good at recognizing the impact that images and stories told in various genres from comedy to thrillers, have in preparing and informing the body politic for the realities of life. We don’t see that range of images and stories from a Black perspective, not in Africa and not in America. It’s beginning to happen, particularly on the Internet. Check out “African City” a series modeled on the American show, “Sex and the City”, about 5 African women returning to Ghana after living and working in the West. One can tell that the creators are conscious of the work that has to be done in the realm of Images and Stories that reflect our internal realities. They are reflecting the dialogues and concerns and challenges of the modern Ghanaian world. Likewise for the movie “Viva Riva”, which was really about the indigenous struggle to benefit from the natural resources of their country, but packaged in a fun and adventurous genre.

  • In the end, Images and Stories are vital information that once in the consciousness of the Black body politic, will begin to reflect in the things we talk about, the agenda’s we set and goals we pursue. CulturalGrassroots.com is where we are gathering to Fund The Images and Stories We Want To See!
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Crowdfunding Attracting the Motivated and Self Confident

Black professionals“Good things come to those that wait, but not to those that wait to late. You’ve got to go for what you know!” –Bill Withers

FORTUNE — There is no shortage of evidence testifying to the value of crowdfunding for those seeking to finance a new product idea, company, or even personal need. Just this month, Kickstarter-born Oculus VR was snatched up by Facebook for $2 billion. Smartwatch-maker Pebble sold more than 400,000 of its crowdfunded smartwatches last year. And in March, Kickstarter surpassed $1 billion in pledges made.

In all, crowdfunding platforms have raised some $2.7 billion and successfully funded more than a million campaigns in 2012, according to a Massolution report, with an 81% increase to $5.1 billion expected for 2013. By 2025, the global crowdfunding market could reach between $90 billion and $96 billion — roughly 1.8 times the size of the global venture capital industry today, according to a 2013 study commissioned by the World Bank.

At the same time, there’s another level of funding going on: for the crowdfunding platforms themselves. Indiegogo, Crowdtilt, Patreon — to name just a few — may seem like grassroots efforts, but they’re doing remarkably well at drawing investments of their own. Indiegogo raised $40 million in a Series B round in January. Not long before, Crowdtilt garnered $23 million in its own Series B. Arts-focused Patreon pulled in $2.1 million in a seed round last summer. And the list goes on.

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